Apple Declines DOJ Request To Unlock Pensacola Gunman's Phones

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Apple Declines DOJ Request To Unlock Pensacola Gunman's Phones

Post by Cat's Paw » Tue Jan 14, 2020 11:29 pm

Apple Declines DOJ Request To Unlock Pensacola Gunman's Phones
https://www.npr.org/2020/01/14/79616052 ... ans-phones
Apple rejected a Justice Department request to unlock two phones used by the Saudi gunman who killed three sailors in Florida. It's another standoff between the government and Apple over privacy.


See link for the rest of the article.



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Re: Apple Declines DOJ Request To Unlock Pensacola Gunman's Phones

Post by Cat's Paw » Tue Jan 14, 2020 11:31 pm

Apple is stronger than our government. We should brake Apple under Anti-Trust Law.
Apple should provide revenue to The Post Office.

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Re: Apple Declines DOJ Request To Unlock Pensacola Gunman's Phones

Post by Cat's Paw » Tue Jan 14, 2020 11:31 pm

Apple is stronger than our government. We should brake Apple under Anti-Trust Law.
Apple should provide revenue to The Post Office.

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Re: Apple Declines DOJ Request To Unlock Pensacola Gunman's Phones

Post by Senor Natural » Wed Jan 15, 2020 2:24 am

Apple is right. Giving the government what it wants here opens the door for the government to do warrantless searches on our phones and invade our privacy.
Ask Apple to look in the phones and provide the government with specific information related to the investigation, but do not give them the code.
Trump's administration, and maybe all others, would definitely abuse our rights if they have the code.

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Re: Apple Declines DOJ Request To Unlock Pensacola Gunman's Phones

Post by Eryk » Wed Jan 15, 2020 3:39 pm

Senor Natural wrote:
Wed Jan 15, 2020 2:24 am
Apple is right. Giving the government what it wants here opens the door for the government to do warrantless searches on our phones and invade our privacy.
Ask Apple to look in the phones and provide the government with specific information related to the investigation, but do not give them the code.
Trump's administration, and maybe all others, would definitely abuse our rights if they have the code.
Edward Snowden already exposes how far the govt is willing to go to expose our privacy. Despite all the federal crimes he exposed, he still needs to hide.

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Re: Apple Declines DOJ Request To Unlock Pensacola Gunman's Phones

Post by Cat's Paw » Fri Jan 17, 2020 11:10 am

All money is a matter of belief. Adam Smith
Read more at https://www.brainyquote.com/authors/adam-smith-quotes

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Re: Apple Declines DOJ Request To Unlock Pensacola Gunman's Phones

Post by Cat's Paw » Fri Jan 17, 2020 1:19 pm

Robert G. Natelson*
ABSTRACT
The Constitution’s Postal Clause granted Congress power to “establish Post Offices
and post Roads.” This Article examines founding-era legal and historical materials to
determine the original meaning and scope of the Postal Clause. It concludes that the
Clause authorized Congress to pass all legislation necessary to create, operate, and
regulate a unified transportation, freight, and courier system, although it also limited
congressional authority in some respects. The founding-era reasons for the postal system
were revenue, promotion of commerce, and political control. The Article also correc

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Re: Apple Declines DOJ Request To Unlock Pensacola Gunman's Phones

Post by Cat's Paw » Fri Jan 17, 2020 1:20 pm

KEYWORDS
Postal Clause; Post Roads; Original Meaning U.S. Constitution; Benjamin Franklin;
British Royal Post Office.
CONTENTS
Br. J. Am. Leg. Studies 7(1) (2018), DOI: 10.2478/bjals-2018-0001
© 2018 Robert G. Natelson, published by De Gruyter Open.
This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.
* Professor of Law (ret.), The University of Montana; Senior Fellow in Constitutional
Jurisprudence, the Independence Institute, Denver, Colorado; Senior Fellow in Constitutional
Jurisprudence, Montana Policy Institute, Bozeman, Montana. Some of the author’s
observations about business practices derive from his private sector experience.
The author acknowledges these individuals who helped make this article possible: Jonathan
Miceli, Sturm College of Law, University of Denver (J.D. 2018), for research assistance;
Virginia Dunn, Archives and Library Reference Service Manager, and Cassandra Farrell,
Senior Map Archivist, both at the Library of Virginia; Professor David Kopel, Sturm College
of Law, the University of Denver and Research Director of the Independence Institute, for his
continued support; Dr. Anne Richardson Oakes for helpful editing and support; and Elizabeth
J. Natelson, for her careful editing.
Introduction ...................................................................................................... 5
A. The Anomalous Character of the Postal Clause...................................... 5
B. This Article’s Structure and Method ....................................................... 6
I. Background History: The British Imperial Postage System........................ 7
A. Why British Practice is Relevant ............................................................ 7
B. The English Beginnings.......................................................................... 8
C. Vocabulary and Operations of the British Postal System.........................9

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Re: Apple Declines DOJ Request To Unlock Pensacola Gunman's Phones

Post by Cat's Paw » Fri Jan 17, 2020 1:24 pm

B. The English Beginnings
The royal post evolved from a network erected in England during the sixteenth
century.21 Its purposes were not limited to mail delivery (“the poste for the pacquet”).22 At least as important was the transportation of persons (“the thorough
[through] poste”).23 During the reign of Queen Elizabeth (1558-1603), there were
six great post roads, together serving as the veins and arteries of the system.24
In Elizabeth’s time private persons could travel over the post roads, but the
message-courier service was formally closed to them. Royal agents and couriers
delivered letters only on official state business. Foreigners and merchants relied on
private networks.25 Others sent correspondence however they could. If they knew
a royal courier was headed in a particular direction, they might ask him to carry
their own letters and packages, either for free or for pay. The government tolerated
the practice unofficially,26 since it preferred that citizens not resort to private
alternatives.
Eventually officials recognized that formally opening the network to private letters
and parcels might benefit the government, and during the 1630s, a postmaster general
named Thomas Witherings, did so.27 Today, Witherings is recognized as a great innovator,
but at the time, some saw him as a troublemaker. He was fired as domestic postmaster in
1637 and as head of the Foreign Letter Office three years later.28
From being a system that no correspondent outside the government could use,
the royal post became the system correspondents were required to use: After 1637,
it was a mail-carrying monopoly.29 Only if the royal post did not serve a town could private couriers carry letters and packages to and from that town—and only from
the nearest post office. Once the government established service in a place, private
carriage to and from that place was banned.30


Apple should PAY $$$ and contract through The Post Office.

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Re: Apple Declines DOJ Request To Unlock Pensacola Gunman's Phones

Post by Cat's Paw » Fri Jan 17, 2020 1:48 pm

The British system was based principally on a network of great post roads
connecting major cities and towns. During the eighteenth century there were still
only six, all radiating from London. The “Great North Road” extended to Edinburgh,
the capital of Scotland and the hub of the Scottish post office.31 A post road did not
derive its name from the mail that traveled over it. A post road derived its name
from the fact that it was punctuated by posts.
A post was a station where correspondence and packages were picked up and
delivered, tired horses exchanged for fresh ones, tolls collected, and vehicles and
guides hired. Either the post itself or the stretch of road between posts could be
called a stage.
32 As the century progressed, officials increasingly supplemented the
great post roads with side routes called cross posts or cross stages. They served
towns located away from the principal highways.33
Each post was overseen by a post-master or post-mistress34 who operated a
post office.
35 The government might employ a local postmaster/mistress directly
or contract out (“farm”) the position. He or she collected tolls, operated a facility
for leasing horses and carriages, and often operated an inn36 and/or published a
newspaper. Evidence of the consanguinity of posts and newspapers still survives
in the names of many British and American journals: the Daily Mail and Yorkshire
Post in England, for example; and the Charleston (S.C.) Gazette-Mail and the
Washington Post in America.
Riders picked up and delivered letters and parcels on a (supposedly) regular
schedule. An ad hoc rider for delivering a particular letter or package was called
an express.
37 Today we associate the word “express” with speed, but originally the
term referred only to the ad hoc nature of the delivery.38
Any traveler using a post road—whether an official courier or a private
individual—was said to ride post.
39 In the most popular English-language poem
of the 1780s,40 The Diverting History of John Gilpin, William Cowper described
how Gilpin lost control of his horse, which tore along the post road from London to
points north. Gilpin’s wife watched helplessly, as she saw
“Her husband posting down
Into the country far away.”41
A courier on horseback was called a post rider, a post boy42 (although most
were full-grown men),43 or simply a post.
44 Grammatically, the noun post in the
expression “post haste” is in the vocative case: The sender wrote the expression on
the outside of a letter to communicate to the post (rider) the need to deliver the letter
quickly.45 Post riders had bad reputations for drinking, delays, and corruption,46
so if the sender was a person of sufficient importance, he might include a threat:
“Haste, post, haste—for your life!”4

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